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Did you know that headlight bulbs dim over time and if you wait until burnout you may lose up to 50 feet of visibility? That’s the length of three large SUVs. And losing this vital visibility after dark could mean the difference between getting into an accident and avoiding one.

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The extreme heat of summer is a memory. The State Fair has come and gone. Migrating water fowl fill the ponds along the river at Tingley Beach. Now it is autumn and, in many ways, it is the best time of the entire year!

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The “Land of Enchantment” brings to mind distant mountain ranges washed in purples and pinks, and rows upon rows of mountain peaks disappearing into a sunlit sky. And there is a sense of mystery in those pastel shapes on the horizon. Let’s visit one up close.

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After completing his voyage to space in July, Virgin Galactic founder Sir Richard Branson announced a space flight sweepstakes program. Enter for an opportunity to win a personal VIP tour of Spaceport America, led by Branson himself, and two tickets to space. Make history as you live out you…

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Electrify your ride with an ebike. Susan Gautsch has a simple goal of supporting active mobility, sustainable transportation and invigorating fun through ebiking. Launched in June, Free-to-Roam eBiking allows people to rent motorized bikes to explore Albuquerque, or just add some fun to your…

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All traffic heading east out of Albuquerque gets squished into the rocky confines of Tijeras Canyon. The Sandia and Manzano Mountains block any other way east between Santa Fe and Belen, a distance of 100 miles. No wonder that Vick’s Vittles, 8810 Central Ave. SE, just a couple miles from Ti…

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Without question, Americans’ relationship with vehicles turned a new direction over the last year and a half, and it is evolving yet again. As vaccination rates increase, restrictions ease and a sense of “normalcy” returns, new research revealed trends in the way drivers view, depend on and …

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On the morning of July 18, 1878, Susan McSween stood across the road from her home as the Lincoln County War approached its climax. The Dolan/Murphy gang had her husband, Alex McSween, surrounded in their house. Ten men were inside including Billy the Kid and the rest of McSween’s self-named…

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You don’t need a monster truck to drive the gravel roads of the Gila. However, here are three tips to make your journey more enjoyable. Take plenty of gas, food and water. Buy a map. Finally, if you don’t like the looks of the road in front of you, turn around.

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If you have a car, a roadmap and a sense of adventure, here’s a perfect trip — the ruins of Pueblo Pintado. Sitting atop a hill overlooking the eastern approaches to Chaco Canyon, Pueblo Pintado was the first encounter many visitors had with Chacoans. Imagine being in a party of traders in t…

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Everyone knows that I-40 replaced Route 66 as the main east-west highway in New Mexico. But did you know that there was a north-south highway that ran right through the middle of the state and was eventually replaced by I-25?

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Our state provides a spectacular backdrop for some of the most scenic campgrounds in the country. But do you know which campgrounds offer the most privacy? Which are the best for first-time campers? Amaris Feland Ketcham traversed the entire state — from the rugged beauty of the Sangre de Cr…

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If you want to get to the ghost town of Riley, prepare yourself for travel on gravel. It is 30 miles from the Bernardo exit off I-25 to the town site. Riley is an uninhabited farming and mining community first settled about 140 years ago. The town was originally named Santa Rita, who is know…

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We were delighted when Jim and Lloryn Swan asked us to accompany them to the Ladd S. Gordon Waterfowl Complex. But I have to admit that, although I had seen a sign for it on I-25 somewhere north of Socorro, I knew nothing about it. The sign had never pulled me off the road.

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The pandemic changed our travel habits considerably, and forced us to reconsider how we get around safely. For example, the latest Hankook Tire Gauge Index found that three-quarters of Americans don’t feel comfortable taking public transportation because of the coronavirus pandemic, leading …

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There are quite a few rock formations in New Mexico named after animals or people — even religious figures. The Kneeling Nun east of Silver City comes to mind. The lone silhouette of a nun on her knees bent towards the altar in prayer is a fixture of the skyline for the whole area.

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When it comes to saving money, it helps to cut out smaller expenses that add up over time — like frequent lunch dates, unused gym memberships or online subscriptions. But if you really want to make a dent in your budget, you need think bigger.

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In most places, even country roads seem to go somewhere. They connect town to town and farms to markets. Not necessarily so in New Mexico. We have lots of roads which wander through the countryside for no real reason — except the joy of backcountry travel.

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On November 19-22, the Friends of Folk Art, in partnership with the Museum of New Mexico Foundation, will host World of Treasures, an online auction of collectors’ quality folk art, fine art and distinctive experiences that will appeal to all tastes and budgets. More than 100 items will be o…

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The COVID-19 pandemic has upended the lives of Americans in many ways, including making families from coast to coast cancel or postpone their vacation plans. However, a new survey reveals that nearly half of U.S. adults are planning to get out and take a trip again soon and a road trip is th…

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It is 8 a.m. in the Datil Well Campground. On this early September morning, the campground is almost empty. I’ve just finished a delicious breakfast of two fried eggs, sausage and potatoes. A pinyon jay is perched in a tree a short distance away. He is waiting for me to leave the table. To m…

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Online car buying has become more popular in recent years. Instead of having to go out to visit dealer lots, car shoppers have found it’s easy to look at inventory, set up test drives, secure financing, negotiate price and complete the purchase — all online, from the comfort and safety of home.

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It was called “The Negro Travelers’ Green Book,” and it was a travel guide to restaurants and places to stay that welcomed African Americans. The 1959 edition only had five listings for Albuquerque: two motels out on west Central, two tourist homes (private residences that rented out rooms t…

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Have you been holed up for a while — unable to travel our great state? These books might help. They’re a journey back in time as told by the participants. They were there — and they can take you there.

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Camping is among the safest of all outdoor activities during COVID-19. Even so, when four of us decided that we were all going camping together recently, I looked for the least-visited campground I could find. We went to the San Mateo Mountains southwest of the town of Magdalena.

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With the closing of most campgrounds this spring, many folks got introduced to the joys of putting up a tent away from the crowds somewhere along a road in the forest, what the Forest Service calls “dispersed camping.”

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In 2002, the day after my retirement from teaching at Monte Vista Elementary School, I found myself looking down U.S. Route 60 at the Arizona/New Mexico border with my friend Mike Moye. Yes, here we were, two “Saturday” bike path riders loaded up and headed east for Texas.

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East of the famous Enchanted Circle in northern New Mexico lies an area which for over a decade was probably the most lawless piece of country in the entire history of the state:  Colfax County.  Here’s how it started.

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MaryAnn and I camped in our little “canned ham” retro trailer at Oliver Lee State Park. It’s a lovely park on the western slope of the Sacramento Mountains just south of Alamogordo. The park is best noted for two things: Dog Canyon and the old Oliver Lee Ranch House.

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Did you know that one in four Americans keep their cars for an average of seven years or more? Nearly another third (29 percent) say they typically own their car for three to four years. With Americans keeping their vehicles on the road for the better part of a decade, it’s important to impl…

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Last year the Honor Flights Network took 21,000 World War II, Korean War and Vietnam War era veterans from around the country aboard flights to Washington, D.C. Over the years, non-profit HFN has taken over 200,000 veterans on these flights to see the memorials dedicated to them in the natio…

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My dad was raised on a farm near Davenport, Iowa. And they never went camping… except for the time the wood stove in the summer kitchen caught the porch on fire and burned down the house. So, any kind of camping was not a tradition in his family. Nevertheless, when he moved to Illinois, marr…

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It’ll happen to every driver and likely at the most inopportune moment — like when you’re running late, on a family road trip or commuting to work. A familiar light will flick on in your car’s dashboard. Sometimes, the low tire pressure indicator can mean it’s time to add more air, caused by…

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The Murray Hotel in Silver City is truly one of the “Grand Old Ladies of the Desert.” But her style is not Victorian. She’s modern — Art Deco.

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Driving can be expensive if you lack basic car-care knowledge or proper insurance. Regular maintenance can prevent costly breakdowns and extend your car’s life, and the right coverage can protect your wallet in the event of an accident.

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White Sands National Monument is the most-visited national park or monument in the state. It has a rare combination of science and beauty that keeps people listening to the tour guides, and staying for the sunsets.

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There are 33 counties in New Mexico. And yes, New Mexico is big, but our counties are extreme in both directions, large and small. For instance, our largest county by area is Catron County with 6,928 square miles. That’s about the same size as New Jersey. At the other extreme, the smallest c…

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Many drivers may feel that they don’t have the time or money to address vehicle repairs immediately, but beware: ignoring some repairs can get you pulled over and even ticketed.

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One of the most notorious unsolved murders of our territorial days, that of Albert Fountain and his eight-year-old son Henry, took place in 1896. They disappeared from a lonely road between Alamogordo and Mesilla, leaving only their abandoned buckboard and two pools of blood.

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Cooke’s Peak is one of the most recognizable mountains in southwestern New Mexico. It looms above the rest of the Cooke’s Range like a pointy cap. Situated in the flat country northeast of Deming, it can be seen for 50 miles. But its real importance was that it marked the only dependable wat…

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As the popularity and availability of electric vehicles (EV) continues to grow in the U.S., a new survey suggests that many consumers still have a lot to learn about the technology.

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I’ve seen pictures of the Dawson Mine for years: coal mine entrances, coke ovens, railroad coal cars ready to be sent the 137 miles to Tucumcari and the Rock Island Line. And I have seen old pictures of the town of Dawson, as well. And pictures are about all that is left. For this coal minin…

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Almost 100 million Americans will go on a family vacation sometime this year, and nearly half of them will choose to make it a road trip, according to the American Automobile Association (AAA).

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Clayton, in the far northeast corner of New Mexico and about 10 miles from the Texas border, is most famous for two things: the dinosaur trackway at Clayton Lake and the somewhat “botched” hanging of train robber Black Jack Ketchum. But the Hotel Eklund, a striking three-story stone structur…

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It’s no secret that sunscreen is essential for protecting our skin from the sun’s damaging rays. Even on a cloudy day, sunscreen is important for helping to reduce early signs of skin aging and skin cancer when used along with other sun protection measures. However, not everything you hear a…

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It was 1896, and New Mexico seemed like the land of opportunity to Frank Boyer.  Boyer, an African American living with his family in Pelham, Georgia, was looking for a better future than what he saw around him: humiliating, restrictive Jim Crow laws and the Ku Klux Klan.